MER’s Journal of Museum Education is publishing a forthcoming special edition on race and museums. A portion of my essay in that edition was used in the Forum and contained several of the following key points as takeaways:

As museum educators, we are not able to think about Diversity and Inclusion within museums as an add-on or last minute item to check off of a list. More than this, our workforce representation, the cultural and information needs of our visitors, requires us to not only create new museum structures which are diverse but to think about how we “practice” diversity. In all, Diversity and Inclusion is a systematic process of space-making.  As we already look with excitement and passion towards the annual meeting of the American Alliance of Museums, I encourage readers as I encouraged Forum participants to think more carefully about cultural competence as an integral part of inclusion practices.  I look forward to this future.

For more information on the MER Forum, my work, or to chat on museums and race, please feel free to contact me at moorepa@email.sc.edu or follow me on Twitter @PorchiaMuseM

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Porchia Moore is a new member of the MER Board and an ABD (All But Dissertation) PhD candidate at the University of South Carolina in the School of Library and Information Science and the McKissick Museum Management program. Her research interests include racial inclusion, community engagement, critical race theory, convergence issues in 21st-century cultural heritage institutions, representations of racial identities in the digital landscape, and LIS curriculum reform. She serves on the Professional Development Committee for the South Carolina Federation of Museums and is a board member for the Friends of African American Art Committee at the Columbia Museum of Art. She regularly presents internationally at both museum and library conferences and is a regular contributing writer for The Incluseum.

Opening photo credit: @interpretkate via Twitter